Tag Archives: FX

The Sons Return for More Anarchy, “Better Call Saul” Gets a Greenlight

*Sons of Anarchy SPOILER ALERT*

RECAP!

For Season 6, the show starts off shortly after where Season 5 left off. Clay (Ron Perlman) and Tara (Maggie Siff) are in prison, Lee Toric (Donal Logue) is still torturing Otto (Kurt Sutter) for the murder of his sister, Bobby (Mark Boone Junior) is taking a break from the MC to clear his head after finding out Jax framed Clay, and Jax (Charlie Hunnam) is continuing his ongoing fight to keep his club and family alive and together.

Lee Toric (Donal Logue)

Lee Toric (Donal Logue)

As always, the show opens with Jax narrating what he’s writing in the journal he’ll one day leave for his sons about his life within the club. Soon after, the show makes its way to the prison where Otto is being held, and apparently raped on regular basis thanks to some connections of Mr. Toric. All part of his torture. You have to wonder why Sutter would write this scene in for his character. All for the sake of the show and storyline, I guess. It takes some guts on his part and on the part of FX for showing the scene. From there Toric makes his way to the other two inmates, Clay and Tara, in order to convince them to rat out Jax and the club. This is gonna lead to more trouble for the club, especially since Clay will do whatever he can to keep from getting killed in prison. I don’t believe Tara will rat, even though she has a chance to get herself and her boys out of Charming for good. At the end of the episode, you also find out that Mr. Toric is a very odd man. Very odd.

Opie’s ex, Lyla (Winter Ave Zoli), gets the crap beat out of her by some Iranian torture porn crew which leads the club to mess up said Iranian torture porn producers even worse, make a new connection with a crooked cop (Peter Weller), and set a new business with a new partner, Colette (Kim Dickens). At the same, one of the Iranian sleazebags makes the wrong comment about Tig’s (Kim Coates) daughter, who was murdered last season, which leads Tig to kill him in quite a unique and disgusting way. It’s easy to see he still isn’t quite right in the head after everything that happened last season.

Chibs (Tommy Flanagan) moves up to VP of the club.

Chibs (Tommy Flanagan) moves up to VP of the club.

Chibs (Tommy Flanagan) is still worried about Juice (Theo Rossi) after he almost sold out the club, killed a member, and then tried to kill himself. Jax wants to give him a chance to redeem himself, which Chibs isn’t okay with but he goes along with it. However, he does give Juice a heavy beatdown and he takes it like a man. There’s also the remaining problem of the repercussions from the death of Damon Pope (Harold Perrineau). They’re working with the club to kill Clay because they believe he killed Pope, but they still want Tig turned over to them for the death of Pope’s daughter. Another stressful decision Jax is going to have to make. Will he hand Tig over or find another way to keep him alive? Or will Tig, not being in a stable state of mind, do something that will lead Jax to hand him over easily?

Throughout the episode, you may have noticed a well-dressed, nameless, blonde boy making his way to school in different scenes. He remains in the background of a lot of shots, just passing through, until the end of the episode. When he arrives, he takes off his jacket, folds it, and lays it on a bench. He rolls up his sleeve to reveal multiple cuts on one of his arms, more than likely from self-harm caused by an unhappy childhood. From his backpack, he takes out a journal and continues to write something in it, as he was shown doing in the beginning of the episode. From there, things become somewhat shocking and unsettling.

After the events at Sandy Hook Elementary in the recent past, it might seem a bit in bad taste to have a school shooting on television, but Kurt Sutter has never been one to shy away from pushing limits and taking his show to places where most wouldn’t go. The boy lays his notebook on the bench, revealing many disturbing writing and drawings. He then takes out a gun, walks into the school, and proceeds to shoot up a classroom. For those weak of heart viewers, worry not, the scene is shown from the outside of the classroom and all that viewers are witness to is the flash from the gun and blood spatter on the windows. Screams and gunfire can be heard as well. I’m not sure how this event pertains to the story, but my guess is that the gun he uses will somehow be traced back to the club or Nero (Jimmy Smits), leading again to more trouble for the MC.

I’ve been looking forward to this season for a while now, and so far, I don’t believe it’s going to disappoint me.

Saul has some of the best advertisements.

Saul has some of the best advertisements.

In television news for next year, AMC has green-lit a prequel, spin-off series of Breaking Bad called Better Call Saul starring Bob Odenkirk as the beloved shyster lawyer, Saul Goodman. The show will focus on the time before Saul was Walter White’s (Bryan Cranston) lawyer and everything that led him to become the Saul we all know and love. I’m wondering if he’s always been the smooth-talking, do-anything-to-stay-out-of-court, ambulance chaser type or if he was an honest, hard-working, by-the-books type and something changed his perspective. It’ll be interesting to find out and see if a show about Goodman can stand on it’s own legs with the help of Walt and Jesse (Aaron Paul). It would be nice, since it will be a prequel, to see the return of Mike (Jonathan Banks) and Gus (Giancarlo Esposito).

Unfortunately, just like Doctor Who, I’ll have to wait until next year to see what happens.

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So Long Dutch

elmore_leonardElmore “Dutch”  Leonard died this week of complications from a stroke he suffered two weeks ago. He was 87.  Leonard was the author of 47 novels and several collections of short stories. Nearly everything Elmore Leonard wrote was optioned by Hollywood. The more notable of which were Get Shorty, Jackie Brown (based on the novel Rum Punch), Out of Sight, and most recently, the FX series Justified (based on the short story Fire in the Hole). Leonard was sometimes happy about how these adaptations turned out.

Born in 1925, Leonard began his career as an advertising man. His first novel, 1953’s The Bounty Hunters was handwritten on yellow legal pads, a habit he never lost. The Bounty Hunters, like most of Leonard’s early works was a western. With 1969’s The Big Bounce Leonard took his gritty characters out of period pieces and into a modern setting. In many ways Leonard reinvented the crime thriller, taking it to a place beyond the dime store pulps.

With Timothy Olyphant on the set of Justified

With Timothy Olyphant on the set of Justified

I first discovered his work on a $0.50 used paperback shelf in my local bookstore. After reading Killshot, I devoured everything Elmore Leonard I could get my hands on. Like many of his readers, I was enamored of the realistic dialogue and the desperately relatable characters. Beyond the wonderfully intricate plots was an ability to allow the dialogue to drive the story. When asked about his dialogue Leonard responded “Don’t you hear people talking? That’s all I do.” It was that dialogue that allowed Leonard to write re-readable thrillers while most are viewed as disposable.

In addition to the gift of his stories, Elmore Leonard offered some advice for the rest of us. Leonard’s Ten Rules for Writing published in 2007 was a list of common sense rules for aspiring authors. With simplistic rules like “Never open a book with weather” and “Never use a word other than “Said” to carry a conversation” The pamphlet offered some insight into his success.

Elmore Leonard, sometimes called the Dickens of Detroit, gave depth to all of his characters. He treated the antagonists with the same care as the protagonists and showed the same concern for each of his stories. Leonard wrote westerns and thrillers with the same attention to each aspect of the narrative. He allowed for humor and depth in each. Leonard’s style and career are best explained by what I believe is the most important of his ten rules: “If it sounds like writing, I rewrite it.”

 

 

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Kurt Sutter Knows How To Make A Grown Man Cry (R.I.P. Opie)

Just gonna say this now, there are gonna be some SPOILERS in here.

Love him or hate him, here’s Kurt Sutter.

Kurt Sutter knows how to write some damn fine television. For the past five seasons, I have been fully engrossed in his show, Sons of AnarchyAnd if you’ve been following the site since the beginning, you already know that I’m a die-hard fan from my recaps/reviews of last season’s episodes. Unfortunately I am without the service of cable television for the moment, so I’m unable to do that again this year. I do catch up on the episodes days after they air, so I may write about the show from time to time this season.

But I digress.

What I’m trying to get at is that the show is amazing and definitely worth watching and if you haven’t taken the time to see it, you should. It will suck you in.

Anyway, getting back to why this article is titled the way it is. Kurt Sutter is one helluva writer and, with the his gift, has the ability to not only make you cry but draw out all sorts of emotions that you never thought you might feel about a television show. Besides having a stellar cast, this is probably the reason why the show has run for five seasons and will run for three more. Like I said before, you get sucked in. It’s almost like you become part of “the life,” — the motorcycle gang life. You care about the characters: you hate some; you love others. When people die, you weep. I know I do. And he makes it worse every year. He kills off Opie’s (Ryan Hurst) wife in the first season, kills off Half-Sack (Johnny Lewis) and has Jax’s son kidnapped in the second. Not to mention, having Gemma (Katey Sagal) raped by white supremacists. In the third season, he has Gemma wanted for murder and on the run. Jax (Charlie Hunnam) and most of the club are in Ireland trying to hunt down his son and kill the Irish mobster who had him kidnapped. Then most of them end up in prison. In season four, they get out but have a butt-load of trouble with federal authorities and a few newer members get killed. Clay (Ron Perlman) becomes a completely despicable monster, beats up Gemma, and kills Piney (William Lucking), Opie’s dad and a founding member of the club.

However, there are some redeeming moments for all of the sadness. One of the main white supremacists gets killed and the rest either die, get the crap kicked out of them, or run out of town. They get Jax’s son back and the Irish mobster gets a Glasgow Smile. Also, a bitchy, trouble-making, double-crossing ATF agent gets popped. Jax and Tara (Maggie Siff) have another son and get married. And Clay gets shot and ends up practically worthless.

(If you’re confused by any of this, then you really just need to catch up on the show. Or read the Wikipedia page.)

 

Opie, right before his final fight. [source: FX]

A lot of those major moments have been heart-wrenching and some have been quite joyous, but there is one recent event that I can never forgive Kurt Sutter for: he killed Opie. One of the best characters on the show, if not THE best, and certainly my favorite. I understand that his death is a plot device and will be used to pretty much drive the season, but I still consider it unforgivable.

He was beaten to death by a rival gang in prison but he “went out like a warrior,” fighting until the very end, defending his brothers. I teared up a bit when this happened. But at the end of the following week’s episode, when the club had his memorial service, that’s when the tears came flowing. I wept like a little girl and cursed Sutter’s name the whole time. The show just won’t be the same without him, but I’ll still watch because I know that, from his death, the rest of this season is going to be really good. Jax is pissed, a lot of people are going to die, and things are going to get crazy.

What did you think about Opie’s death? Or any of the deaths so far in the series?

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